©2018 by Workplace Equity Partners

CREATING WORKPLACES WHERE YOUR PEOPLE THRIVE.

 

ABOUT US

Everyone deserves the chance to thrive at work.

Easy to agree, hard to implement - pay, leadership roles, engagement in the work community, access to growth opportunities. We've made progress in recognizing the oppression that has been a barrier to many identities, but there is still work to do. If your organization is not yet reaching its goals of creating an equitable workplace, we can help.

Workplace Equity Partners ensures your people can thrive in your workplace and, in turn, you are better at what you do by helping you reach parity of pay, opportunity, and satisfaction in the workplace. We are you partner in creating this real change by bringing evidence from multiple disciplines to manifest social change and re-imagine the rules of work. We focus on tried-and-true actions to achieve representation and equity in the workplace, staring with how each individual can see themselves as a vital part of the solution. We link this evidence with your core values and organizational goals to ensure you are reaching the right people and moving toward parity.

Workplace Equity Partners is located in Metro Denver. Denver overlays Ute, Cheyenne, and Arapaho land.

 

THE TEAM

 

ANNIE CONTRACTOR

Founder & CEO

Annie Contractor grew up in rural Wyoming, served as a US Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia, hand-built a log cabin, farmed lettuce in Hawai'i, and amplified Brazilian activists. Along the way she designed and led four social justice research studies on three continents that have directly impacted food security, environmental justice, housing justice,and low-income mothers' access to quality jobs. Workplace Equity Partners leverages these skills of applied research and resiliency planning to the task of eliminating differences in pay, career opportunity, and work satisfaction for people of all identities - so they, and the organizations in which they work, can thrive.

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NATALIE PROCHASKA

Intern, PhD Candidate

Natalie studies financial segregation in city-building and how access to capital restricts opportunity. She evaluates how the process of assessing risk drives inequality forward.  Natalie volunteers with Build Programs Not Jails and First Followers, fighting for alternatives to incarceration and providing re-entry support and advocacy in Champaign, Illinois.

Natalie is spearheading Workplace Equity Partners' original research into how equity issues vary by industry.

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Annie is a talented, thoughtful, and dedicated person who works to understand people's diverse perspectives. Annie recognizes past history to break down systemic barriers to find equitable solutions. Annie is an excellent facilitator and communicator. I recommend working with her for strategic planning and problem-solving.”

Grace Kyung, Special Projects Director, Trailnet

Since the beginning of the [Consultants for Good] network, Annie has consistently offered to compile notes, manage sessions, and, most recently, lead one of our sessions on incorporating Racial Equity into our work as consultants. She and her co-facilitator led the session with humility and honesty, creating a space where people felt comfortable working through some tough conversations. She skillfully kept the group on track while allowing for more discussion as needed. I am excited to continue working with Annie and highly recommend her as a contributor and a presenter.

Lauren Andraski, Social Impact Consultant

Annie is a pleasure to work with an excellent project manager. She is capable of conquering the most complex assignments in an efficient manner and expertly communicating outcomes.”

Martha Reisch, Statewide Donor Strategy Manager, Climb Wyoming

"Annie Contractor is a thoughtful and committed project manager. She was integral to developing and managing a research team that used interviews and demographic trend data to characterize efforts toward more inclusive stream remediation outcomes in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The work resulted in a peer-reviewed scientific publication [Is a clean river fun for all? Recognizing social vulnerability in watershed planning] that is available online.”

Dr. Bethany Cutts, Assistant Professor of Human Dimensions of the Environment, NC State University